10 College Admission Trends You Should Know

During a recession, college is definitely the safest place to be. But no matter how smart or talented a student is, it's all up to college admissions. With more competition to get into college and to nail a solid job, institutions and students will continue to see changes in their admissions every year. Here are 10 college admission trends you should know:

 

 

  1. This year — 2011 — is the toughest admissions year yet

    This year has been the hardest for high school seniors applying to college. A combination of the weak economy and the increased number of applications each student submits has made it much harder to get into college. Years ago, seniors typically applied to a handful of schools, but now students have doubled their application submissions to 10 or even 30 schools.

  2. More students are interested in southern colleges

    In recent years, more college students have been saying goodbye to snow and hello to sunshine as they make their way down south for school. Whether it's the quality of education or quality of life, students are taking greater notice of what southern colleges have to offer year-round.

  3. International student applications are on the rise

    An increase in the number of international students applying to American schools has made getting into college even more competitive. And colleges are accepting more international students because they provide a financial boost by paying full price to attend school in the United States.

  4. More grad students are aiming for Ivy League

    Ivy League schools have always been the quintessential place to receive an education, especially a graduate degree. But now the country's unemployment rate and increased job competition have made this dream of attending an Ivy League school a necessity for many students who want to outshine their peers and lock-in a good job. In addition to competing with fellow graduates, students will also have to beat out recently laid off workers who hold years of experience and industry knowledge.

  5. More homeschoolers are applying to college

    Over the last few years, admissions departments have seen an increase in the number of homeschoolers applying to college. While it's nice to diversify, many colleges find it difficult to compare homeschoolers to traditional students, therefore making the admissions process a little more tricky.

  6. Admissions waitlists are growing

    More colleges have admitted that their dreadful admissions waitlists are growing in size to account for more applicants. Schools like Harvard and Princeton no longer have early admissions and have to implement the waitlist, which makes it extra difficult and painfully nerve-wracking for applicants. During this waiting period, students are more likely to send follow-up recommendation letters and pull as many strings as possible.

  7. Public schools are accepting more out-of-state students

    In an effort to diversify and, of course, cash in on higher tuition rates, public schools are admitting more out-of-state students. Public schools are also accepting more non-resident students because it helps increase their numbers and avoid the need for more student housing.

  8. More college applicants are interested in creative writing

    Today's college applicants are showing a greater interest in creative writing programs and are making their choice of college based on this subject. Whether students are just looking to build up their creative writing portfolios or have a sudden urge to write, creative writing has and will certainly continue to be a popular major for students.

  9. More Californians are applying out of state

    It might seem strange that California students are applying outside of their beautiful and educationally renowned state for college, but the decline in state funding has left many with no other choice. California schools are accepting fewer freshmen than in the past to counteract the budget cuts. In fact, just under 70% of California freshmen were accepted for fall 2011, which is down from 71.7% in 2010 and 72.6% in 2009.

  10. More students are taking a gap year before college

    Over the last few years, admissions departments have noticed that more students are taking a gap year before attending college. There are many reasons that students are opting for a break, such as lack of tuition money, high school burnout and even fulfilling a desire to travel abroad, volunteer and work. Another major factor in students' decisions to take a gap year is the increased competition to get into college.

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